Applications for Vacuum Pumps in the Medical Industry

Applications for Vacuum Pumps in the Medical Industry

Vacuum technology has changed a lot about the way medical professionals interact with their patients. The increased use of vacuum in the medical industry has led to many advancements that make hospitals and offices more sanitary and efficient. Vacuum pumps, in particular, see widespread use in many different fields of medicine. Let’s take a look at the applications for vacuum pumps in the medical industry.

Autoclaving Sterilization

One of the most common applications for vacuum pumps in the medical industry is for sterilization purposes. Having sterile tools, clothes, and equipment is crucial to providing healthcare, and vacuum pumps take on the job with ease.

An autoclave chamber uses a vacuum pump to remove trace elements from medical equipment. This allows pressurized steam to penetrate bacteria and viruses more quickly, eliminating them from surfaces.

Central Vacuum Systems

Medical professionals would have a much harder time performing surgeries without the use of vacuum technology. You may have heard of central vacuum systems in homes before, and while they’re certainly useful there, they become even more important in a medical setting. Central vacuum systems and their pumps help to remove any liquids produced during surgery, so they don’t interfere with the area of work.

Respiratory Devices

Many devices help patients breathe, and some of them use vacuum technology to perform this function. Not only does the vacuum ensure no other elements get transferred to the patient, but they also help regulate airflow from one place to another. Respiratory devices like these rely on vacuum pumps to keep patients alive for extended periods of time.

Dental Vacuum Suction

We’ve all been to the dentist and had them tell us to hold onto that strange suction straw as they worked. Did you know that you interacted with advanced vacuum technology in that moment? Those straw-like devices utilize vacuum pumps to remove excess materials such as saliva, blood, and water from the area where the dentist works.

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